rAmblr.

Apr 20

[video]

Apr 19

[video]

Apr 18

“Oscar Wilde said that if you know what you want to be, then you inevitably become it - that is your punishment, but if you never know, then you can be anything. There is a truth to that. We are not nouns, we are verbs. I am not a thing - an actor, a writer - I am a person who does things - I write, I act - and I never know what I am going to do next. I think you can be imprisoned if you think of yourself as a noun.” —

Stephen Fry (via purplebuddhaproject)

Strongly relate to this one right now.

(via antinpursuit)

(via petrak)

jtotheizzoe:

Tripedal to the Metal
That’s some loco motion, huh? Found this neat little GIF showing how an ant’s legs move at a full gallop. While calmly strolling though the picnic grounds, ants have five of their six legs at a time in contact with the ground. But when it’s time to put the (tiny) pedal to the metal, they change their gait to this alternating tripod motion.
This pattern isn’t controlled by the insect’s brain, but rather by bundles of neurons in the leg called central pattern generators. While moving at such a clip, it just so happens that three legs is the minimum number it needs on the ground at a time to balance its rigid exoskeleton without toppling over.
Is that part of the reason that insects have six legs and not another number like four or eight? Or did the gait evolve to match the hardware? My guess is the latter, but I am not sure. What say you, insect folks? 
(GIF via NC State University)

jtotheizzoe:

Tripedal to the Metal

That’s some loco motion, huh? Found this neat little GIF showing how an ant’s legs move at a full gallop. While calmly strolling though the picnic grounds, ants have five of their six legs at a time in contact with the ground. But when it’s time to put the (tiny) pedal to the metal, they change their gait to this alternating tripod motion.

This pattern isn’t controlled by the insect’s brain, but rather by bundles of neurons in the leg called central pattern generators. While moving at such a clip, it just so happens that three legs is the minimum number it needs on the ground at a time to balance its rigid exoskeleton without toppling over.

Is that part of the reason that insects have six legs and not another number like four or eight? Or did the gait evolve to match the hardware? My guess is the latter, but I am not sure. What say you, insect folks? 

(GIF via NC State University)

mathani:

This puzzle consists of four hinged pieces which can be folded one way to a square and the other way to an equilateral triangle. Master puzzler Henry Dudeney demonstrated a wooden model before the London Royal Society in 1905.

mathani:

This puzzle consists of four hinged pieces which can be folded one way to a square and the other way to an equilateral triangle. Master puzzler Henry Dudeney demonstrated a wooden model before the London Royal Society in 1905.

(via we-are-star-stuff)

[video]

Apr 17

[video]

[video]

newyorker:

In memory of the Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who died today at 87, a look back at Jon Lee Anderson’s 1999 Profile of the writer: http://nyr.kr/QrWlKv

Que descance el Gabo.

newyorker:

In memory of the Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who died today at 87, a look back at Jon Lee Anderson’s 1999 Profile of the writer: http://nyr.kr/QrWlKv

Que descance el Gabo.

(Source: archives.newyorker.com)

angrynerdyblogger:

cats can straight up do that double jump video game thing

angrynerdyblogger:

cats can straight up do that double jump video game thing

(Source: kittiezandtittiez, via obiboing)